Monday, April 24, 2017

2017 Way to a Better Life Contest FINALE - TOMORROW NIGHT

The contest Finale will be held TOMORROW, Tuesday, April 25 at Gene Fullmer at 6pm and will last for approximately 30 minutes. We will provide a summary of the contest, raffle off prizes and announces the winners of the 2017 Way to a Better Life Contest. Hope to see you there!

Thursday, April 20, 2017

2017 WBL Contest - At Home Challenge

The contest may be ending but it doesn't mean the fun has to end! We are offering an additional challenge for those that would like a little additional incentive to keep going on their own.The At Home Challenge will run from May 1 - May 28.

Complete the one month challenge on your own and at the end of the challenge email your point total to healthywestjordan@gmail.com. Participants in the At Home Challenge will be entered into a prize drawing. Point totals need to be submitted by midnight on Friday, June 2, 2017 in order to be included in the raffle.

We will also provide an opportunity for a follow-up weigh-in during the week of May 30-June 2 to anyone that is interested. Please schedule a follow-up weigh-in by Friday, May 26 by emailing healthycommunities@slco.org or call 385-468-5256 / 385-468-5258

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

2017 Way to a Better Life Contest Wrap Up

CONGRATULATIONS!

YOU DID IT! 
You completed the 2017 Way to a Better Life Contest!

We hope you enjoyed the contest and that you found ways to create lasting habits that will continue to improve your health.

The winners of the 2017 Way to a Better Life Contest will be announced next Tuesday, April 25 at Gene Fullmer at 6pm and will last for approximately 30 minutes. We will also provide a summary of the contest and raffle off other prizes.

We hope you can come join us to celebrate your success and the success of others that participated in the contest.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Final Weigh-In TONIGHT

It is already here! The final weigh-in for the 2017 Way to a Better Life Contest. 

The final weigh-in will be held at the Gene Fullmer Recreation Center (8015 S. 2200 W.) from 5:30pm-7:30pm. You can come by anytime during the final weigh-in to complete your post-assessment testing and record your final weight and points for the contest.

What to expect: 
*Anticipate the post-assessments to take about 30-45 min. to complete.
When you arrive at Gene Fullmer you will go through six stations:
1- Check-in - Pick up your assessment form
2- Weight - Weigh-In for the your official final weight
3- Body Composition - Body Fat percentage measured
4- Waist Circumference Measurement
5- After Photo
6- Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Testing - *This station will most likely take the longest so please be patient. 


Thursday, April 13, 2017

Fruit and Veggie Tip: Roast or Stew

ROAST
  • Red peppers in the oven at 450°, turning every 15 minutes until done (blackened skins). Peel off the skin and slice them, then drizzle in oil and garlic and refrigerate. A Perfect addition to any salad, sandwich or antipasto dish!
  • Whole red potatoes in the oven after tossing them in a mixture of olive oil, garlic and rosemary until tender for a mouth-watering side to any meal!
  • Some winter vegetables cut in large pieces – parsnips, turnips, rutabaga, beets, sweet potato are some good choices. Coat lightly with olive oil, sprinkle with your favorite herbs, and roast at 425° for 30-40 minutes until tender and browned.
  • Brussels sprouts drizzled lightly with olive oil, and sprinkled with salt. Magnifique!
  • Thin slices of sweet potato to make chips.
STEW
  • Pears. Peel and core and stew gently in cinnamon, sugar and water until tender. Perfect for an after-dinner treat!
  • Cabbage with tomatoes and garlic to serve over rice for a unique side dish to any meal!
  • Classic stew vegetables such as potatoes, carrots, green beans, celery, onions in canned tomato sauce. Substitute canned beans like kidney beans or black beans for meat.
  • Frozen corn, onions, peppers, celery, and salsa. Serve over rice. Add some red or black beans and call it a meal!
  • Canned tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, and chickpeas. Add oregano and top with sliced olives.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Fruit and Veggie Tip: Microwave












MICROWAVE
  • Any of your favorite chopped veggies in a bowl with an egg or two for a quick, nutritious breakfast.
  • Cranberries and orange zest with a little sugar and water to make a sweet cranberry relish.
  • Frozen or canned vegetables on those busy nights.
  • Spaghetti squash by cutting in half lengthwise and putting face down in a dish with water. Scoop out squash and serve like spaghetti with tomato sauce and/or Parmesan cheese.
  • A potato for lunch and top with low-fat cottage cheese and chives.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Fruit and Veggie Tip: Sauté













Sauté
  • Pear and apple slices (peeled) in a skillet with a little butter until tender. Add marmalade and orange slices, remove from heat and serve for a fruity dessert.
  • Cauliflower with nutmeg and oil after pre-steaming for a tasty twist on an old veggie.
  • Spinach with garlic and olive oil.
  • Green and yellow summer squash with onion and garlic. Season with salt and pepper, and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. For a different twist, add chopped tomato and basil.
  • A variety of different colored peppers with onion. Serve as a side dish.

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Fruit and Veggie Tip: Grill












GRILL
  • Mushrooms, bell peppers, onions and tenderloin for the perfect summer kabobs.
  • Corn on the cob. Peel and coat in a mix of seasonings such as oregano, pepper, onion and chili powders and salt with a touch of butter to help it stick. Wrap in aluminum foil and grill until tender.
  • Pineapple, peaches or mango. Top with a dollop of low-fat ice cream, frozen yogurt or sherbet.
  • Asparagus and add to a salad of mixed greens, roasted peppers and toasted nuts.

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Fruit and Veggie Tip: Steam














STEAM
  • Artichokes for a long time (about an hour) to get flavorful leaves perfect for dipping! Try them with a tasty almond pate.
  • Any of your favorite vegetables with citrus juice and zest added to the water to create bold, new flavors. Try lemon juice with spinach, orange with broccoli or grapefruit with carrots!
  • A medley of vegetables and season with some herbs. Serve over couscous.
  • Cabbage, and season with caraway seed, salt and pepper.
  • Green beans with chopped onion. Add a clove of garlic to cooking water.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Fruit and Veggie Tip: Blanch














BLANCH
  • Almonds in water for 15 seconds and peel for a new twist on a healthy snack.
  • Basil and parsley leaves. Blend together with olive oil, pine nuts, garlic and a little lemon juice for a great pesto!
  • Broccoli and cauliflower to use on a vegetable platter for snacks and appetizers.
  • Broccoli rabe in salted water to reduce bitterness. Then cook like broccoli.
  • Carrots, cauliflower, green beans, asparagus and broccoli. Marinate in your favorite low-fat vinaigrette and serve cold. If desired, add other veggies like onions, mushrooms and peppers.

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Fruit and Veggie Tip - Bake












BAKE
  • Sweet potato fries by cutting up into slices and seasoning with olive oil, cayenne pepper and a dash of salt.
  • Peaches for a sweet snack. Slice in half, drizzle on some honey and sprinkle with ginger and pecans.
  • Winter squash. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with cinnamon.
  • A potato for lunch. Top with broccoli and a sprinkle of cheese.
  • An apple for dessert. Fill the core with dried fruit and nuts

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Fruit and Veggie Tip - Boil

















BOIL
  • Diced or crushed tomatoes in a vegetable or chicken broth for the base of a homemade tomato soup! Add fresh herbs and spices to make your own unique recipe.
  • Apples with lemon juice and cinnamon. Mash up and serve warm or chilled.
  • Turnips and potatoes. Mash them together and season with salt and pepper.
  • Kale, and add a handful of chopped currants, salt and pepper.
  • Butternut squash and season with salt, pepper and a drizzle of olive oil.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Fruit and Veggie Tip - Stir Fry














STIR FRY
  • Pineapple and mango in a honey ginger sauce for a perfect topping to low- or fat-free ice cream.
  • Zucchini, yellow squash, diced tomatoes and mushrooms with olive oil and herbs. Add some diced jalapeno for an extra kick and serve over brown rice.
  • Broccoli in olive oil and chopped garlic. Add some capers for extra zip.
  • Frozen mixed veggies. Add a dash of low sodium soy sauce, or flavor with herbs.
  • Onions, peppers, zucchini, corn and jicama. Throw in some red or black beans. Season with your favorite salsa to give it a Southwestern flair. Serve over rice.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Focus on Fruit

10 tips to help you eat more fruits















Eating fruit provides health benefits. People who eat more vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Fruits provide nutrients vital for health, such as potassium, dietary fiber, vitamin C, and folate (folic acid). Most fruits are naturally low in fat, sodium, and calories. None have cholesterol. Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as a part of the Fruit Group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.

  1. Keep visible reminders. Keep a bowl of whole fruit on the table, counter, or in the refrigerator.
  2. Think about taste. Buy fresh fruits in season when they may be less expensive and at their peak flavor. Add fruits to sweeten a recipe.
  3. Think about variety. Buy fruits that are dried, frozen, and canned (in water or 100% juice) as well as fresh, so that you always have a supply on hand.
  4. Don’t forget the fiber. Make most of your choices whole or cut-up fruit, rather than juice, for the benefits that dietary fiber provides.
  5. Be a good role model. Set a good example for children by eating fruit every day with meals or as snacks.
  6. Include fruit at breakfast. At breakfast, top your cereal with bananas, peaches, or strawberries; add blueberries to pancakes; drink 100% orange or grapefruit juice. Or, try a fruit mixed with fat-free or low-fat yogurt.
  7. Try fruit at lunch. At lunch, pack a tangerine, banana, or grapes to eat, or choose fruits from a salad bar. Individual containers of fruits like peaches or applesauce are easy and convenient.
  8. Experiment with fruit at dinner, too. At dinner, add crushed pineapple to coleslaw, or include orange sections, dried cranberries, or grapes in a tossed salad.
  9. Snack on fruits. Dried fruits make great snacks. They are easy to carry and store well.
  10. Keep fruits safe. Rinse fruits before preparing or eating them. Under clean, running water, rub fruits briskly to remove dirt and surface microorganisms. After rinsing, dry with a clean towel.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Vary Your Veggies

10 tips to help you eat more vegetables
It’s easy to eat more vegetables! Eating vegetables is important because they provide vitamins and minerals and most are low in calories. To fit more vegetables in your meals, follow these simple tips. It is easier than you may think.
  1. Discover fast ways to cook. Cook fresh or frozen vegetables in the microwave for a quick-and-easy dish to add to any meal. Steam green beans, carrots, or broccoli in a bowl with a small amount of water in the microwave for a quick side dish.
  2. Be ahead of the game. Cut up a batch of bell peppers, carrots, or broccoli. Pre-package them to use when time is limited. You can enjoy them on a salad, with hummus, or in a veggie wrap.
  3. Choose vegetables rich in color. Brighten your plate with vegetables that are red, orange, or dark green. They are full of vitamins and minerals. Try acorn squash, cherry tomatoes, sweet potatoes, or collard greens. They not only taste great but also are good for you, too.
  4. Check the freezer aisle. Frozen vegetables are quick and easy to use and are just as nutritious as fresh veggies. Try adding frozen corn, peas, green beans, spinach, or sugar snap peas to some of your favorite dishes or eat as a side dish.
  5. Stock up on veggies. Canned vegetables are a great addition to any meal, so keep on hand canned tomatoes, kidney beans, garbanzo beans, mushrooms, and beets. Select those labeled as “reduced sodium,” “low sodium,” or “no salt added.”
  6. Make your garden salad glow with color. Brighten your salad by using colorful vegetables such as black beans, sliced red bell peppers, shredded radishes, chopped red cabbage, or watercress. Your salad will not only look good but taste good, too.
  7. Sip on some vegetable soup. Heat it and eat it. Try tomato, butternut squash, or garden vegetable soup. Look for reduced- or low-sodium soups.
  8. While you’re out. If dinner is away from home, no need to worry. When ordering, ask for an extra side of vegetables or side salad instead of the typical fried side dish.
  9. Savor the flavor of seasonal vegetables. Buy vegetables that are in season for maximum flavor at a lower cost. Check your local supermarket specials for the best-in-season buys. Or visit your local farmer’s market.
  10. Try something new.  You never know what you may like. Choose a new vegetable—add it to your recipe or look up how to fix it online.

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Overcoming Barriers

Understanding common barriers to physical activity and creating strategies to overcome them may help you make physical activity part of your daily life.

Lack of Time:

  • Identify available time slots.  Monitor your daily activities for one week.  Identify at least three 30 minute time slots you could use for physical activity.
  • Add physical activity to your daily routine.  For example, walk or ride your bike to work or shopping, organize school activities around physical activity, walk the dog, exercise while you watch TV, park farther away from your destination, etc.
  • Select activities requiring minimal time, such as walking, jogging, or stair climbing.

Social Influence:

  • Explain your interest in physical activity to friends and family.  Ask them to support your efforts.
  • Invite friends and family members to exercise with you.  Plan social activities involving exercise.
  • Develop new friendships with physically active people.  Join a group, such as the YMCA or a hiking club.

Lack of Energy:

  • Schedule physical activity for times in the day or week when you feel energetic.
  • Convince yourself that if you give it a chance, physical activity will increase your energy level; then, try it.

Lack of Motivation:

  • Plan ahead.  Make physical activity a regular part of your daily or weekly schedule and write it on your calendar.
  • Invite a friend to exercise with you on a regular basis and write it on both your calendars.
  • Join an exercise group or class.

Fear of Injury:

  • Learn how to warm up and cool down to prevent injury.
  • Learn how to exercise appropriately considering your age, fitness level, skill level, and health status.
  • Choose activities involving minimum risk.

Lack of Skill:

  • Select activities requiring no new skills, such as walking, climbing stairs or jogging.
  • Take a class to develop new skills.
  • Select activities that require minimal facilities or equipment, such as walking, jogging, jumping rope, or calisthenics (exercises using your own body weight).
  • Identify inexpensive, convenient resources available in your community (community education programs, park and recreation programs, worksite programs, etc.)

Weather Conditions:

  • Develop a set of regular activities that are always available regardless of weather (indoor cycling, aerobic dance, indoor swimming, calisthenics, stair climbing, rope skipping, mall walking, dancing, gymnasium games, etc.)

Travel:

  • Put a jump rope in your suitcase and jump rope.
  • Walk the halls and climb the stairs in hotels.
  • Stay in places with swimming pools or exercise facilities.
  • Join the YMCA or YWCA (ask about reciprocal membership agreement).
  • Visit the local shopping mall and walk for half an hour or more.
  • Bring your MP3 player with your favorite aerobic exercise music.

Family Obligations:

  • Trade babysitting time with a friend, neighbor, or family member who also has small children.
  • Exercise with the kids-go for a walk together, play tag or other running games, get an aerobic dance or exercise tape for kids (there are several on the market) and exercise together.  You can spend time together and still get your exercise.
  • Jump rope, do calisthenics, ride a stationary bike, or use other home gymnasium equipment while the kids are busy playing or sleeping.
  • Try to exercise when the kids are not around (e.g. during school hours or nap times)

Retirement Years:

  • Look upon your retirement as an opportunity to become more active instead of less.  Spend more time gardening, walking the dog, and playing with your grandchildren.  Children with short legs and grandparents with slower gaits are often great walking partners.
  • Learn a new skill you’ve always been interested in, such as ballroom dancing, square dancing, or swimming.

Content in the "Personal Barriers" section was taken from Promoting Physical Activity: A Guide for Community Action (USDHHS, 1999).

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Active Lifestyle

A physically active lifestyle is fundamental to good health. Regular exercise is one of the best predictors of health, and no matter what you weigh, you can’t afford to be a couch potato. Yet most Utah adults don’t meet the recommended levels of physical activity.
So where do you start? Escaping from a sedentary lifestyle can seem daunting, but it doesn’t need to be. Here are some tips for developing and maintaining a regular physical activity regimen.
Just start, no matter how small! The rule with exercise is that none is bad, some is good, and more is better. Don’t worry if you can’t meet the recommendations right away. Be patient, and aim for progress, not perfection.

  • Start with aerobic activities, which have the most substantial health benefits. Use large muscle groups for enough time to raise your heart rate and break a sweat. Later on, you can add balance, flexibility, or strength training for even more benefits.
  • Start slowly and build up slowly. If you’ve been inactive for some time, you might just take a ten-minute walk every couple of days. But schedule a time and make it a part of your routine. Later, you can increase the duration of the exercise, and then the intensity. Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate activity each week. (Just 30 minutes, five days a week!)
  • Sit less. Too much time sitting can increase your risk for chronic disease, even if you get the recommended 150 minutes a week. Aim for less than two hours of screen time a day, not including work and school, and try to sit for less than six hours total. If you have to sit a lot, stand up and move around for two or three minutes every half hour.
  • Do what works for YOU. You’re more likely to keep a habit that reflects who you are and what you enjoy. Exercising with a friend or family member can help you stay on a schedule and can make workouts more fun. But listening to music or audiobooks can give you time for solitude and reflection. Find what works for you.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Vigorous intensity means you're breathing hard and fast, and your heart rate has gone up quite a bit. If you're working at this level, you won't be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath. Here are some examples of activities that require vigorous effort:

  • Jogging or running
  • Swimming laps
  • Riding a bike fast or on hills                          
  • Playing singles tennis
  • Playing basketball                                                    

Build up over time
If you want to do more vigorous-level activities, slowly replace those that take moderate effort like brisk walking, with more vigorous activities like jogging.

You can do moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic activity, or a mix of the two each week. A rule of thumb is that 1 minute of vigorous-intensity activity is about the same as 2 minutes of moderate-intensity activity.

Some people like to do vigorous types of activity because it gives them about the same health benefits in half the time. If you haven't been very active lately, increase your activity level slowly. You need to feel comfortable doing moderate-intensity activities before you move on to more vigorous ones. The guidelines are about doing physical activity that is right for you.

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise

Moderate intensity means you're working hard enough to raise your heart rate and break a sweat. One way to tell is that you'll be able to talk, but not sing the words to your favorite song. Here are some examples of activities that require moderate effort:

  • Walking fast
  • Doing water aerobics
  • Riding a bike on level ground or with few hills
  • Playing doubles tennis                                                 
  • Pushing a lawn mower

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Aerobic Activity

Aerobic activity or "cardio" gets you breathing harder and your heart beating faster. From pushing a lawn mower, to taking a dance class, to biking to the store – all types of activities count. As long as you're doing them at a moderate or vigorous intensity for at least 10 minutes at a time.

Intensity is how hard your body is working during aerobic activity.

How do you know if you're doing light, moderate, or vigorous intensity aerobic activities?
For most people, light daily activities such as shopping, cooking, or doing the laundry doesn't count as moderate or vigorous aerobic activity because your body isn't working hard enough to get your heart rate up.



Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Strength training: Get stronger, leaner, healthier

Strength training is an important part of an overall fitness program. Here's what strength training can do for you — and how to get started.

Want to reduce body fat, increase lean muscle mass and burn calories more efficiently? Strength training to the rescue! Strength training is a key component of overall health and fitness for everyone.

Use it or lose it

Lean muscle mass naturally diminishes with age.

You'll increase the percentage of fat in your body if you don't do anything to replace the lean muscle you lose over time. Strength training can help you preserve and enhance your muscle mass at any age.

Strength training may also help you:

  • Develop strong bones. By stressing your bones, strength training can increase bone density and reduce the risk of osteoporosis.
  • Manage your weight. Strength training can help you manage or lose weight, and it can increase your metabolism to help you burn more calories.
  • Enhance your quality of life. Strength training may enhance your quality of life and improve your ability to do everyday activities. Building muscle also can contribute to better balance and may reduce your risk of falls. This can help you maintain independence as you age.
  • Manage chronic conditions. Strength training can reduce the signs and symptoms of many chronic conditions, such as arthritis, back pain, obesity, heart disease, depression and diabetes.
  • Sharpen your thinking skills. Some research suggests that regular strength training and aerobic exercise may help improve thinking and learning skills for older adults.

Consider the options

Strength training can be done at home or in the gym. Common choices include:

  • Body weight. You can do many exercises with little or no equipment. Try pushups, pullups, abdominal crunches and leg squats.
  • Resistance tubing. Resistance tubing is inexpensive, lightweight tubing that provides resistance when stretched. You can choose from many types of resistance tubes in nearly any sporting goods store.
  • Free weights. Barbells and dumbbells are classic strength training tools.
  • Weight machines. Most fitness centers offer various resistance machines. You can also invest in weight machines for use at home.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Muscle Strengthening Activities

Besides aerobic activity, you need to do things to strengthen your muscles at least 2 days a week. These activities should work all the major muscle groups of your body (legs, hips, back, chest, abdomen, shoulders, and arms).

To gain health benefits, muscle-strengthening activities need to be done to the point where it's hard for you to do another repetition without help. A repetition is one complete movement of an activity, like lifting a weight or doing a sit-up. Try to do 8—12 repetitions per activity that count as 1 set. Try to do at least 1 set of muscle-strengthening activities, but to gain even more benefits, do 2 or 3 sets. 

You can do activities that strengthen your muscles on the same or different days that you do aerobic activity, whatever works best. Just keep in mind that muscle-strengthening activities don't count toward your aerobic activity total.

There are many ways you can strengthen your muscles, whether it's at home or the gym. You may want to try the following:

  • Lifting weights
  • Working with resistance bands
  • Doing exercises that use your body weight for resistance (i.e., push-ups, sit ups)
  • Heavy gardening (i.e., digging, shoveling)
  • Yoga                                 

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Physical Activity

Physical activity simply means movement of the body that uses energy. Walking, gardening, briskly pushing a baby stroller, climbing the stairs, playing soccer, or dancing the night away are all good examples of being active. For health benefits, physical activity should be moderate or vigorous intensity.
 
Moderate physical activities include:
    businessman on bike
  • businessman on bike
  • Walking briskly (about 3½ miles per hour)
  • Bicycling (less than 10 miles per hour)
  • General gardening (raking, trimming shrubs)
  • Dancing
  • Golf (walking and carrying clubs)
  • Water aerobics
  • Canoeing
  • Tennis (doubles)
Vigorous physical activities include: 
  • Running/jogging (5 miles per hour)
  • Walking very fast (4½ miles per hour)
  • Bicycling (more than 10 miles per hour)
  • Heavy yard work, such as chopping wood
  • Swimming (freestyle laps)
  • Aerobics
  • Basketball (competitive)
  • Tennis (singles)
You can choose moderate or vigorous intensity activities, or a mix of both each week. Activities can be considered vigorous, moderate, or light in intensity. This depends on the extent to which they make you breathe harder and your heart beat faster.
 
Only moderate and vigorous intensity activities count toward meeting your physical activity needs. With vigorous activities, you get similar health benefits in half the time it takes you with moderate ones. You can replace some or all of your moderate activity with vigorous activity. Although you are moving, light intensity activities do not increase your heart rate, so you should not count these towards meeting the physical activity recommendations. These activities include walking at a casual pace, such as while grocery shopping, and doing light household chores.

Source: https://www.choosemyplate.gov/physical-activity-what-is

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Benefit of Physical Activity

The benefits of exercise go far beyond weight management. They also include:

  • A lower risk of anxiety and depression
  • Better sleep, and a boost to your energy, mental sharpness, and creativity
  • Lower risks for hypertension, stroke, heart disease, diabetes, and breast and colon cancer
  • Greater muscle mass and bone density, fat reduction, and an improved body image
  • Reduce risk of cardiovascular disease
  • Strengthens bones and muscles
  • Improve your ability to do daily activities and prevent falls, if you’re an older adult
  • Increase your chances of living longer

Check with your doctor before starting a new exercise program, especially if you haven’t exercised for a while or if you have chronic health problems, such as heart disease, diabetes, or arthritis. If you want a personalized plan, your primary care provider can help get you started.

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Intuitive Eating - Honor your Health --Gentle Nutrition

Honor Your Health--Gentle Nutrition

Make food choices that honor your health and taste buds while making you feel well. Remember that you don't have to eat a perfect diet to be healthy. You will not suddenly get a nutrient deficiency or gain weight from one snack, one meal, or one day of eating. It's what you eat consistently over time that matters, progress not perfection is what counts.

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Intuitive Eating - Exercise - Feel the Difference

Exercise--Feel the Difference

Forget militant exercise. Just get active and feel the difference. Shift your focus to how it feels to move your body, rather than the calorie burning effect of exercise. If you focus on how you feel from working out, such as energized, it can make the difference between rolling out of bed for a brisk morning walk or hitting the snooze alarm. If your only goal is to lose weight, it's usually not a motivating factor in that moment of time.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Intuitive Eating - Respect Your Body

Respect Your Body

Accept your genetic blueprint. Just as a person with a shoe size of eight would not expect to realistically squeeze into a size six, it is equally as futile (and uncomfortable) to have the same expectation with body size. But mostly, respect your body, so you can feel better about who you are. It's hard to reject the diet mentality if you are unrealistic and overly critical about your body shape.

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Intuitive Eating - Honor Your Feelings Without Using Food

Honor Your Feelings Without Using Food

Find ways to comfort, nurture, distract, and resolve your issues without using food. Anxiety, loneliness, boredom, anger are emotions we all experience throughout life. Each has its own trigger, and each has its own appeasement. Food won't fix any of these feelings. It may comfort for the short term, distract from the pain, or even numb you into a food hangover, but food won't solve the problem. If anything, eating for an emotional hunger will only make you feel worse in the long run. You'll ultimately have to deal with the source of the emotion, as well as the discomfort of overeating.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Intuitive Eating - Discover the Satisfaction Factor

Discover the Satisfaction Factor

The Japanese have the wisdom to promote pleasure as one of their goals of healthy living. In our fury to be thin and healthy, we often overlook one of the most basic gifts of existence--the pleasure and satisfaction that can be found in the eating experience. When you eat what you really want, in an environment that is inviting and conducive, the pleasure you derive will be a powerful force in helping you feel satisfied and content. By providing this experience for yourself, you will find that it takes much less food to   decide you've had "enough."

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Intuitive Eating - Respect Your Fullness

Respect Your Fullness.

Listen for the body signals that tell you that you are no longer hungry. Observe the signs that show that you're comfortably full. Pause in the middle of a meal or food and ask yourself how the food tastes, and what is your current fullness level?


Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Intuitive Eating - Challenge the Food Police

Challenge the Food Police

Scream "NO" to thoughts in your head that declare you're "good" for eating under 1000 calories or "bad" because you ate a piece of chocolate cake. The Food Police monitor the unreasonable rules that dieting has created . The police station is housed deep in your psyche, and its loud speaker shouts negative barbs, hopeless phrases, and guilt-provoking indictments. Chasing the Food Police away is a critical step in returning to Intuitive Eating.

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Intuitive Eating - Make Peace with Food

Make Peace with Food

Call a truce, stop the food fight! Give yourself unconditional permission to eat. If you tell yourself that you can't or shouldn't have a particular food, it can lead to intense feelings of deprivation that build into uncontrollable cravings and, often, bingeing When you finally “give-in” to your forbidden food, eating will be experienced with such intensity, it usually results in Last Supper overeating, and overwhelming guilt.

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Intuitive Eating - Honor your Hunger

Honor Your Hunger

Keep your body biologically fed with adequate energy and carbohydrates.
Otherwise you can trigger a primal drive to overeat. Once you reach the moment of excessive hunger, all intentions of moderate, conscious eating are fleeting and irrelevant. Learning to honor this first biological signal sets the stage for re-building trust with  yourself and food.

Use the Hunger & Fullness Scale to listen to your body and pay better attention to when you are hunger and when you are full.


Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Intuitive Eating - Reject the Diet Mentality

Intuitive eating is an approach that teaches you how to create a healthy relationship with your food, mind, and body. Over the next week or so we will focus each day on 1 of the 10 guiding principles of Intuitive Eating. 


Reject the Diet Mentality. Throw out the diet books and magazine articles that offer you false hope of losing weight  quickly, easily, and permanently. Get angry at the lies that have led you to feel as if you were a failure every time a new diet stopped working and you gained back the weight. If you allow even one small hope to linger that a new and better diet might be lurking around the corner, it will prevent you from being free to rediscover Intuitive Eating.

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Dimensions of Health and Wellness

Health is not just a physical aspect. Consider the other aspects of health and think of ways you can improve your health by focusing on something beyond the physical.


Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Hunger Fullness

One way to get back in touch with your body and to live a healthier life is to pay attention and be mindful when you are eating. Start by paying attention to your hunger and fullness. Use the scale below to help you get more in tune with your eating habits and develop a healthier relationship with food.


Monday, January 23, 2017

Flourless Peanut Butter, Oat & Banana Pancakes

Nutrition Challenge Starts TODAY

This is a great opportunity to focus on improving your diet. The Nutrition Challenge is designed to encourage you to incorporate a more balanced diet into your daily life. Use the tracker sheet on page 7 of your participant packet to mark off the boxes as you complete the weekly challenges. Each challenge is worth 10 points with a max of 70 points per week. Points earned will go toward contest point totals.


Friday, January 20, 2017

Daily Caloric Intake

Whether your goal is weight loss or not it is important to understand and know how much fuel your body needs in order for you to be healthy and function properly. Look at page 14-16 in your participant packet to find out what your energy needs might be for you to accomplish your health goals.